Information Flux in the 21st Century

It’s Inhuman

We are supposed to be able to find anything we want on the Internet, aren’t we? I do know that’s not the case, but occasionally, I am pretty wide eyed, especially when that anything is something I had access to not so long ago. Why wouldn’t I expect to again find that rare French film that a benevolent person uploaded to YouTube to be discovered by a classmate who kindly shared the link with me.

That was a month ago, and here I am, putting together the pieces for a digital project for my film class. My inspiration for this project happens to be a rare gem from 1924, L’Inhumaine, that I watched thanks to the chain of events mentioned above.  Off I go to YouTube, eager to savor favorite details in the film that I hope to include in my project.

YouTube_why

Oh no! Say it isn’t so! Say it isn’t so! It’s gone! Can’t be. Go back and check the link… pant, pant… search again…. a few times more. GONE!

Ye watchdogs of the web, protecting web publishers’ rights, I appeal to you. What about those of us who want nothing more than access to information for the benefit of curiosity about the world around? We suffer. That lone copy of an important film made briefly available, gives us a glimpse of an exciting period when artists were eager to work together in new medium.

Vintage Ad Browser

Vintage Ad Browser

To you, Lobster Films, how wonderful of you to restore this treasure, and even endeavor to recreate Darius Milhaud’s composition. Have my cries to you been heard?

My peers in the academic libraries that have a copy in their holdings, my interlibrary loan requests go unfilled. Why have you forsaken me? Our mission is the same.

I forge ahead, being ever grateful for the enriching books, and access to them, that give me the confidence to proceed without the benefit of a deeper look at the film.

* Update, 11/7/2015: An academic library has come through! I have a VHS in hand to borrow for two weeks. Thank you!

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November 1, 2015 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , ,

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